an After abortion

REAL, CONFIDENTIAL, FREE, NON-JUDGMENTAL HELP TO AVOID ABORTION, FROM MANY PLACES:
3,400 confidential and totally free groups to call and go to in the U.S...1,400 outside the U.S. . . . 98 of these in Canada.
Free, financial help given to women and families in need.More help given to women, families.
Helping with mortgage payments and more.More help.
The $1,950 need has been met!CPCs help women with groceries, clothing, cribs, "safe haven" places.
Help for those whose babies haveDown Syndrome and Other Birth Defects.
CALL 1-888-510-BABY or click on the picture on the left, if you gave birth or are about to and can't care for your baby, to give your baby to a worker at a nearby hospital (some states also include police stations or fire stations), NO QUESTIONS ASKED. YOU WON'T GET IN ANY TROUBLE or even have to tell your name; Safehaven people will help the baby be adopted and cared for.

Wednesday, May 4, 2005

Exhale is a San Francisco-based post-abortion hotline that is partially funded by Planned Parenthood.

As Bay Area Post-Abortion Service Goes National, Letting Women “Exhale”, an article in a Bay Area women's magazine reports:

It was the first after-abortion talkline in the country and on June 1 it will expand its access nationwide in four languages, including English, Spanish, Cantonese, and Vietnamese.
That would depend on how you define "talkline", I guess. Project Rachel has had a national toll-free hotline since 1992, and Rachel's Vineyard has had one since 1999.

Since last I looked, Exhale has substantially upgraded its website, adding significant new content, including this:

If you have been diagnosed, or have self-diagnosed, as having Post-Abortion Stress Syndrome, Exhale understands that having a name for what you’re feeling and experiencing can feel important. Many women find the experience of identifying with this syndrome as positive and affirming. It is also important to know that having feelings about a significant life event doesn’t mean that you have a major psychological condition that requires medical care. For many women, naming and expressing their emotions, and having the space and support to do so, can be more empowering than being identified as having a disorder. Whether or not you think you have PASS, the most important thing is that you get support for what you’re feeling, not what someone else thinks you should be feeling. Exhale trusts you to know what feels right for yourself.
I can just imagine how long it took them to hash out this paragraph and yet it ends up sounding like...what it sounds like is a mother who is a practicing therapist who is pretty much out-of-touch with her teenage daughter but who is trying valiantly to "connect" with her.

"Honey, you have been diagnosed by your friends, or have self-diagnosed, as being "in love" with Johnny. Many women find the experience of identifying with being "in love" as positive and affirming. It is also important to know that having feelings about Johnny doesn't mean that...it doesn't mean that you...it's not necessarily that big of a deal, okay? For many women, naming and expressing their emotions, and having the space and support to do so, can actually be MORE empowering than using the words "in love". Whether or not you think you are "in love", the most important thing is that you get support for what you're feeling...not for what Johnny thinks you are feeling, or what those skanky girlfriends of yours think you are feeling. Honey, I totally, totally, totally trust you to know what feels right for yourself. Really. I do."

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